Monthly Archives: October 2013

Reflection 5

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Following on from last weeks tasks and lectures, personally I found that the sub-editing section of the seminar helped me to not only persevere with the development of my work but also improve it. I did this by shortening sentences to make them more precise and easier to read. I also included some primary source material from a staff nurse working at one of the hospitals that was under scrutiny by the press. This helped my piece to have more human emotion helping my audience to get a true feeling from the people that downgrades and redundancies are affecting .

Too improve your posts by adding images, here is how to do it;

  • Firstly click your cursor anywhere in the text where you want your image to be
  • Click the media icon ‘Add Media’
  • Then Click on ‘Media Library’
  • Choose the picture you want to use and click ‘Show’
  • Choose where you want it to sit ‘Left, Centre or Right’
  • Choose the size you want your image to be
  • Then Click ‘Insert into post’

To edit the image after posting just click on the image and again choose from the options available to modify it in your post.

Most photographic images online are JPEG or Joint Photographic Experts Group images, the reasons for this are;

  • JPEG supports 16.7 million colour per image
  • It is accepted as a default format for photos on the web
  • its aggressive compression makes file sizes smaller
  • it is supported in all major web browsers
  • Many cameras can write images
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Creating a Pitch for my final peice

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Aspiring artists to embark on a journey so amazing you would be foolish not to go with them.

First paragraph: This will give a brief description on who ‘Rime Suspex’ and ‘Allessandria’ are including their names, age and where they’re all from. Also the debut tracks that have been released so far and how they formed. E.G) Rime Suspex as a band and Allessandria as a female vocalist.

Content: The body of my article will include…

  • Direct quotes
  • Story around their struggles and hardships trying to make it big
  • What they are doing today
  • How they have made is this far E.G) what both acts have already achieved
  • How people react to their music E.G) gig turnouts

The article will be 800 words long, including information on upcoming performances, how to listen to their music online and on social media and contact numbers.

Reflection 4

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Primary and secondary sources 

The difference between primary and secondary sources are;

A primary source is material that you gather yourself.

Primary sources may be:

* Quotes from an interview you conducted yourself.

* Data from polls you conducted yourself

* Information from statistics, reports or white papers.

* Material directly gathered via social media.

* Media that you created yourself – including photographs.

A secondary source is an article, document or report that is used as source material for another article.

Secondary sources may be:

* Quotes used from newspaper articles.

* Information from blogs or online sources

* Quotes from books, documentaries or other narrative sources.

* Material found on social media

Primary sourcing is vital to a story because you get the human story and the person’s true opinions and feelings. It shows good journalism skills and demonstrates your ability to communicate with members of the public. This give your reader an insight on peoples opinions on the subject area you are writing about.

When discussing interviews the things that stood out to me was the fact that journalists can now use Skype as a source of interviewing. These Skype calls can be recorded for future use using two easy methods, these are;

Method One – costs 1.6p per minute

* Buy some credit on Skype and call your interviewee’s phone number.

* Record the interview.

Method Two – free

* If your interviewee has Skype – you can make a “Skype-to-Skype” call, for free.

* Record the interview.

The advantages of using Skype are that it is ready to edit and can be used online with no messing around with discs or cables.

Panic for NHS staff redundancies. (sub-editied version)

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NHS Staff all over England face “rock bottom morale” due to downgrading staff and possible redundancies.

Four London A&E departments are closing emergency treatment centres due to staff shortages and downgrades, according to BBC News.

A legal challenge to downgrade four West London A&E departments has been rejected.

Under the ‘Shaping a Healthier Future Programme’ A&E units are under threat in Charing cross, Central Middlesex, Hammersmith and Ealing. The Ealing council leader announced “The NHS want to treat people like guinea pigs in the largest experiment in its history and we believe it is only right that our very serious concerns get proper consideration”.

Other areas of the country are facing similar problems.

‘Rock bottom morale’ and ‘panic’

A document was accidentally made viewable to staff at Liverpool’s Alder Hey hospital, according to BBC News Liverpool.

A message saved to a public computer folder proposed 20 possible redundancies among nursing and administration staff at Alder Hey in West Derby. Staff say it caused “rock bottom morale” and “panic”.

‘Disappointed’

A plan to downgrade Dewsbury and Pontefract hospitals has also been agreed, according to BBC News; Leeds & West Yorkshire

The Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust want seriously ill Dewsbury and Pontefract patients to be treated in Wakefield.

Wakefield and Kirklees health scrutiny joint committee said it was not convinced the proposals were in the “best interests” of residents.

This scenario has been a worry amongst NHS hospitals staff. These downgrades leave NHS workers with the threat of loosing up to £14,000 a year with 3 years protected pay.

Official government Human Resources Policy No. HR11 states;  “under this arrangement staff who are downgraded continue to receive their basic pay for a period of three years” of section 6.2.1.

Staff struggle to properly and safely treat patients in the face of cuts. Mrs Fiona Selby, 46, a staff nurse at Alder Hey said, “We’re running on bare minimum staff and care sometimes suffers because of staff shortages.”

 

Creative Commons

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Copyright Laws

In all cases journalists must respect copyright law. This is a form a legal protection that automatically occurs assigned to content the moment you create it. For example when I publish this posts on my blog, it will be protected by this law. This means that it gives the creator a number of exclusive rights and only the creator can;

  • Claim authorship
  • Distribute the work
  • Reproduce the work
  • Create new works based on the original

Also the owner can often sell these rights to other people, but if anyone breaks this permission, it is in fact breaking the law.

However, there are some methods that allow other people to use your content with something called Fair Dealing. This is where some use of copyright is allowed in such ways as;

  • Research and Private study
  • Criticism and Review
  • News Reporting (except original photography and videos)
  • Incidental Inclusion

In all these cases sources must be attributed and the amount of material must be “necessary for the purpose”.

Creative Commons

Creative commons means some rights reserved and is an ‘open source’ to licensing for content online.

Creative Commons helps you share your knowledge and creativity with the world. It develops, supports, and stewards legal and technical infrastructure that maximizes digital creativity, sharing, and innovation. It is a non-profit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools.

Our free, easy-to-use copyright licenses provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choice. CC licenses let you easily change your copyright terms from the default of “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.”

Creative Commons licenses are not an alternative to copyright. They work alongside copyright and enable you to modify your copyright terms to best suit your needs.

What can Creative Commons do for me?

If you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, you should consider publishing it under a Creative Commons license. CC gives you flexibility (for example, you can choose to allow only non-commercial uses) and protects the people who use your work, so they don’t have to worry about copyright infringement, as long as they abide by the conditions you have specified.

If you’re looking for content that you can freely and legally use, there is a giant pool of CC-licensed creativity available to you. There are hundreds of millions of works — from songs and videos to scientific and academic material — available to the public for free and legal use under the terms of our copyright licenses, with more being contributed every day.

I myself am planning to publish my work under creative commons to give me and others wanting to use my content the flexibility and protection that’s needed.

 

Reflection 3

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The main differences that I have noticed between traditional printed context and online context is…

The layout is different, printed context follows this structure;

  • Head (or Title)
  • Strap
  • Byline
  •  Body

* Sub Heading or Cross Heading every 300-400 words

* Page length – 1200 – 1600 words (broadsheet)

* Page length – 750 – 1000 words (magazine)

Online context follows this structure;

  • Head (or Title)
  •  Strap
  • Byline
  • Body

* Page lengths – 250 – 750 words HALF the word count or less of print

* Sub Heading or Cross Headings are more frequent

* Multimedia content breaks up text

The article structure that both traditional print and online content is called the ‘inverted pyramid’. Here is an example.

Most Newsworthy Information,

Who, What, Where, When, Why, How?

|

Important Details

|

Other General Information & Background Information

Also newspapers are often read folded in two. Because of this editors would place big stories at the top of the page “above the fold”. The same terminology is used in digital journalism.

However, online writing styles use concise simple language and avoid ‘marketing’ jargon. Also shorter sentences are used so it sounds more conversational and stay on the readers level. In addition to this headings are made more descriptive and simple to draw the readers attention.

When it comes to the publishing process sub-editors have to read an article before it is released to the public. This is called ‘subbing’ and it is said that a good sub-editor reads a story FIVE times.

Some good websites to help guide sub-editors when processing text is Jounalism.co.uk. The website provides one-day online sub-editing course aimed at anyone who has to edit copy for a living and who wants to adapt to the brave new online world. It also offers practical guidance on optimising content for the web in a people and search-engine friendly way.

This one-day intensive course will cover:

  • Adapting and marketing the skills you already have
  • Building confidence in handling web stories
  • The principal differences between subbing for print and subbing for websites
  • Content management systems (CMS), and how they work (although please note we will not be teaching any particular program as software will vary between workplaces)
  • Search engine optimisation techniques (SEO) – how to attract traffic and make sure readers find your stories easily
  • Best practice for hyperlinking
  • How to tag your story and enter other metadata
  • How to write web-friendly headlines – writing heads for the web requires different skills and different thinking to writing for print
  • Creating a story as part of a well-presented online package
  • The legal pitfalls to avoid – brush up on your media law for a digital age

I chose to reference this website because I feel that it not only helps sub-editors already in the industry, but gives aspiring sub-editors an idea of what it takes to become one and how easy it is to get experience online.

“People rarely read Web pages word by word; instead, they scan the page, picking out individual words and sentences. In research on how people read websites we found that 79% of our test users always scanned any new page they came across; only 16% read word-by-word.”

Jakob Nielsen – Nielsen Norman Group –  http://www.nngroup.com/

Jakob Nielson meant by this quote that web users scan rather than read, so therefore writers need to;

  • Make the headline and strap informative rather than clever
  • Use shorter paragraphs (one idea per paragraph)
  • Break up the copy with shorter, frequent and informative cross headers
  • Use block quotes (from a source in the middle of a copy) and callouts (Containing a juicy snippet)
  • Use lists
  • Use multimedia to tell the story

Staff in NHS Hospitals all over the country still facing downgrades and redundancies

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Staff in Hospitals all over England are still facing mental turmoil due to downgrading staff and possible redundancies.

‘not convinced proposals were in the best interests of the residents’

Four London A&E departments are changing where patients are treated due to staff shortages and downgrades, according to BBC News.

A legal challenge to the decision to downgrade four West London A&E departments has been rejected.

Under the ‘Shaping a Healthier Future Programme’ A&E units are under threat in Charing cross, Central Middlesex, Hammersmith and Ealing hospitals. The Ealing council leader announced “The NHS want to treat people like guinea pigs in the largest experiment in it’s history and we believe it is only right that our very serious concerns get proper consideration”.

Other areas of the country out facing the same sorts of problems.

‘Rock bottom morale’ and ‘panic’

A document was accidentally made viewable to staff At Liverpool’s  Alder Hey hospital, according to BBC News Liverpool.

A message saved to a public computer folder is believed to have proposed 20 possible redundancies among nursing and administration staff at Alder Hey in West Derby. Staff say it has caused “rock bottom morale” and “panic”.

‘Disappointed’

Dewsbury and Pontefract hospitals downgrade plan agreed, according to BBC News; Leeds & West Yorkshire

The Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust want to cut services in Dewsbury and Pontefract and treat seriously ill patients in Wakefield.

Wakefield and Kirklees health scrutiny joint committee said it was not convinced the proposals were in the “best interests” of residents.

The trust said it was “disappointed” by the committee’s decision.

This scenario has continued to be a recurring subject amongst NHS hospitals leaving staff at risk. These downgrades are leaving NHS workers with the threat of loosing up to £14,000 a year with only 3 years protected pay. Official government Human Resources Policy No. HR11 states;  “under this arrangement staff who are downgraded continue to receive their basic pay for a period of three years” of section 6.2.1.

Can staff and patients continue to be safe and properly treated with these continuing changes?