Grafic Interchange Format (GIF’s)

Standard

The Graphics Interchange Formatis a bitmap image format that was introduced by CompuServe in 1987and has since come into widespread usage on the World Wide Web due to its wide support and portability.

The format supports up to 8 bits per pixel for each image, allowing a single image to reference its own palette of up to 256 different colors chosen from the 24-bit RGB color space. It also supports animations and allows a separate palette of up to 256 colors for each frame.

These palette limitations make the GIF format unsuitable for reproducing colour photographs and other images with continuous colour, but it is well-suited for simpler images such as graphics or logos with solid areas of colour.

  • GIFs are suitable for sharp-edged line art (such as logos) with a limited number of colours. This takes advantage of the format’s lossless compression, which favours flat areas of uniform colour with well defined edges.
  • GIFs can be used to store low-colour sprite data for games.
  • GIFs can be used for small animations and low-resolution film clips.
  • Since a single GIF image palette is limited to 256 colours, it is not usually used as a format for digital photography. Digital photographers use image file formats capable of reproducing a greater range of colours, such as TIFF, RAW or JPEG.

While meeting the specification if my first pitch, to avoid copyright of cartoon images and logos, I collaborated a ‘GIF’ using an online resource called gifmaker.me. Here I used Google images to put together my own individual image to represent the cartoon being discussed. Both GIF images have been posted in my media library.

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